Hemmoroid and Pregnant Women  

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Babies do not actually suffer from hemorrhoids, but do their bit to cause them! Pregnant women often get the condition, as a result of the strain of carrying the baby and also from the strain of giving birth. This susceptibility to baby hemorrhoids is caused by the uterus directly sitting on top of the blood vessels which should drain the hemorrhoid veins. In addition, the pregnancy hormone progesterone relaxes the walls of the veins. All this makes the veins in this part of the body to swell. This situation is worsened further by long periods of standing or sitting.

When it comes to giving birth, the pressure on the abdomen, just as occurs in a bowel movement, can inflate these veins. These postpartum hemorrhoids, as they are known, are hard to avoid. After all, giving birth does involve a certain amount of pushing! If you are unfortunate enough to get baby hemorrhoids along with baby, there are things you can do to help reduce any pain and discomfort. The first 24 hours after delivery could be used to apply ice packs. After this, you could try warm sitz baths, dabbing with sterile cotton balls dosed in Witch Hazel or using ointments containing hydrocortisone. If you can avoid being constipated, this will help. In any event, the baby hemorrhoids should go away as your body regains its strength after the strain of childbirth.

A recommended remedy for pregnant women is to lie down on your left side, every four to six hours, for approximately 20 minutes. This routine lowers the pressure on the main vein, which drains the lower portion of the body.

Source: http://www.healthguidance.org/authors/504/Jeanette-Pollock

What Happens To Your Body When You Quit Smoking?  

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Ever wonder what happens to your body the moment you stop smoking?

Within 20 minutes of smoking that last cigarette, the body begins a series of changes that continues for years.


Blood pressure drops to normal.
Pulse rate drops to normal.
Body temperature of hands and feet increases to normal.


Carbon monoxide level in blood drops to normal.
Oxygen level in blood increases to normal.


Chance of heart attack decreases.


Nerve endings start regrowing.
Ability to smell and taste is enhanced.


Circulation improves.
Walking becomes easier.
Lung function increases up to 30%.


Coughing, sinus congestion, fatigue, and shortness of breath decrease.
Cilia regrow in lungs, increasing ability to handle mucus, clean the lungs, and reduce infection.
Body’s overall energy increases.


Excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker.


Lung cancer death rate for average smoker (one pack a day) decreases by almost half.
Stroke risk is reduced to that of a nonsmoker 5-15 years after quitting.
Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat and esophagus is half that of a smoker’s.


Lung cancer death rate similar to that of nonsmokers.
Precancerous cells are replaced.
Risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney and pancreas decreases.


Risk of coronary heart disease is that of a nonsmoker.

What Are Some Rewards of Quit Smoking!

Immediate Rewards
Within 12 hours after you have your last cigarette, your body will begin to heal itself. The levels of carbon monoxide and nicotine in your system will decline rapidly, and your heart and lungs will begin to repair the damage caused by cigarette smoke.

Within a few days you will probably begin to notice some remarkable changes in your body. Your sense of smell and taste may improve. You will breathe easier, and your smoker’s hack will begin to disappear, although you may notice that you will continue to cough for a while. And you will be free from the mess, smell, inconvenience, expense, and dependence of cigarette smoking.

Immediate Effects
As your body begins to repair itself, instead of feeling better right away, you may feel worse for a while. It’s important to understand that healing is a process­p;it begins immediately, but it continues over time. These “withdrawal pangs” are really symptoms of the recovery process.

Immediately after quitting, many ex-smokers experience “symptoms of recovery” such as temporary weight gain caused by fluid retention, irregularity, and dry, sore gums or tongue. You may feel edgy, hungry, more tired, and more short-tempered than usual and have trouble sleeping and notice that you are coughing a lot. These symptoms are the result of your body clearing itself of nicotine, a powerful addictive chemical. Most nicotine is gone from the body in 2-3 days.

Long-range Benefits
It is important to understand that the long range after-effects of quitting are only temporary and signal the beginning of a healthier life. Now that you’ve quit, you’ve added a number of healthy productive days to each year of your life. Most important, you’ve greatly improved your chances for a longer life. You have significantly reduced your risk of death from heart disease, stroke, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, and several kinds of cancer­p;not just lung cancer. (Cigarette smoking is responsible every year for approximately 130,000 deaths from cancer, 170,000 deaths from heart disease, and 50,000 deaths from lung disease.)

Article courtesy of www.quitsmokingsupport.com

41 Tips To Help You Quit Smoking  

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1. Quitting smoking is not as hard as you think. Once you begin to be honest with yourself and to look at the facts about smoking, it will become a pleasure to remove this addiction from your life.

2. Square off with your smoking habit. Look at it and size it up. Ask yourself exactly what it is doing for you; then ask yourself what it is not doing for you. You can begin with your hair and work your way down to the tips of your toes. It is a medical fact that smoking affects every organ in the human body in a harmful way.

3. Look at quitting cigarettes as giving yourself a gift-a very big gift. You are giving yourself a better quality of life and, very possibly, a longer life. You are giving yourself a healthier body. You are giving yourself more self-esteem. Wrap all this in a package and look at it for the gift it really is, then “Go for it!”

4. Set a date. Make a commitment. Give it a try. Remember, it is alright if you don’t succeed at first. Just keep trying. The only way you can lose is by ceasing to try.

5. Don’t look at it as if you are giving up something. This makes it seem too much like a loss. What you are really doing is tossing something out of your life that has done you harm and doesn’t belong here anymore. You are throwing away pure garbage. No longer are you going to allow your lungs to be a resting place for nicotine and tars.

6. Always keep a positive attitude. After all, this is one of the most positive things you’ve ever done. Stay away from negative people and worrisome situations.

7. Quit for yourself. Even though your family and loved ones will benefit tremendously from your quitting, it is you that will benefit most.

8. Treat giving up smoking with the respect it rightly deserves. Become willing to go to any lengths to remove it from your life. If you are not willing, try praying for the willingness. This usually works.

9. Look up the word ‘nicotine’ in your dictionary and write down the definition in big letters: “A poisonous alkaloid used as an insecticide.’ Put it where you can see it.

10. Don’t say “I’ll take my chances’ and continue to smoke. They are not ours to take. We didn’t give ourselves life and we don’t have the right to “take our chances” on giving it away. That is up to God.

11. Don’t fool yourself by saying you have too many pressures in your life right now to give up cigarettes. If you are smoking, this in itself is a very great pressure. Every day is a gamble and your life is at stake. By getting nicotine out of your life, other things will become easier to handle. You will feel better about yourself and you will have more energy. You will have accomplished something more meaningful than all the money and material objects you could ever acquire. You will have given yourself what no one else could give you. You will no longer have the pressures of being a smoker.

12. Don’t use the excuse that you might gain weight to justify your continuing to smoke. Even if you do gain a little, the fact that you will be more active and will get more exercise should counteract any weight gain. Remember, overeating, not stopping smoking, causes weight gain.

13. Plan to do things that will keep your mind off smoking. Sometimes our minds can be our worst enemies. They will tell us that we need a cigarette for just about any reason that is handy at the time. By doing things like going to the movies in the non-smoking section, munching on corn or sucking on a lollipop, we can keep our minds occupied and get a break. Go to museums and other places where smoking isn’t allowed. Swimming is a good idea, too.

14. Quit smoking one day at a time and think only about the part of the day you are in. “I am not going to smoke before noon.” “I am not going to smoke before three o’clock.” Sometimes just do it one hour at a time. This is a lot easier than trying to quit forever.

15. Don’t subject yourself to smoky situations. If you do come in contact with someone who is smoking, just say to yourself “He is having the cigarette I might be having”; then, be grateful you don’t have to have it.

16. While you are quitting. Look at it as an investment. Once you have quit for one hour, you have invested this hour in becoming a healthier person. Now, invest one more hour. Continue to add to your investment hour by hour. It will grow and become more valuable as the hours go by. You will begin to see and feel the rewards from this investment more and more. Protect and guard it just as you would a treasure.

17. Start being kind to yourself, It is the beginning of a new way of life for you and you are the most important one there. Treat yourself with respect and love and, remember, you are no longer filling your system with poison every few minutes. Breathe the clean air and breathe it deeply. Smell the different and wonderful fragrances. Begin to spend time outdoors close to nature. Many new sensations await you.

18. Don’t get too angry. If we are angry, our minds tell us we need a cigarette to cope. Until your mind learns that it doesn’t need a cigarette to cope, try to avoid situations that might be setting you up. Avoid certain people that may bother you. If there is a lot of tension at work, try to get a few days off. If you can’t get some time off, quit smoking on a long weekend. Avoid, as best you can, things like getting stuck in traffic. Use a lot of caution. Anger can be very destructive.

19. Don’t get too hungry. It is amazing how our minds will tell us that everything’s wrong when all we really need to do is eat.

20. Don’t get too tired. If we are tired, it is easy to become irritated and when we get irritated our minds will tell us that a cigarette will help. Our overall resistance becomes weak and it is easy to say, “Oh well, I guess I’ll smoke.”

21. Don’t get too lonely. It is good to know some people who are going through the same thing. By going to Nicotine Anonymous meetings you can get phone numbers of such people.

22. You can remember these four things by the word “HALT.” Hungry, angry, lonely, tired. If you feel you need a cigarette, check. Make sure you are not experiencing any of these.

23. Don’t get too bored. It is hard to just sit and not smoke. Keep busy. Find things to do that you enjoy. Bike riding, hiking, swimming, exploring new places, trying new restaurants. This is the time to indulge yourself.

24. Have something to fidget with. We are accustomed to holding a cigarette; being without one might leave our hands at a loss. Get a small rubber ball or a yo-yo. Play dough is good also, or a piece of clay.

25. Have something handy to put in your mouth. Life Savers are good, or any slowly dissolving candy. Beef jerky and lollipops help, too. Avoid fattening foods like cookies. They don’t last long and they fill you up. Experiment while you are still smoking to see what will relieve the craving. If Life Savers work, then stock up. Just a note of caution: don’t use this type of substitute on a long-term basis.

26. If you always have a cigarette with a cup of coffee, stop drinking coffee before you quit smoking.

27. Don’t drink alcohol while you are quitting. Once alcohol is in your system your defenses will diminish greatly.

28. Remember that the discomfort you experience in the first 2 weeks will definitely come to an end and you will never have to go through it again.

29. Frequently give yourself a pat on the back. What you are doing isn’t easy by any means. It takes a lot of guts to try to quit smoking.

30. If you are feeling pain from withdrawal, let it become a lasting memory to serve as a reminder of exactly how strong the drug nicotine is and how hooked you really are.

31. Remember, every minute you were sucking on cigarettes they were sucking on you. They were sucking the very life out of you. Don’t let them have any more.

32. Avoid the self-pity trap. If we begin to feel sorry for ourselves, our minds will tell us that we deserve a cigarette to make us feel better.

33. Remember, if you just keep trying, you will win. It is good against evil and the odds are stacked in your favor.

34. Before quitting, plan your activities for the first few days after you quit. This way you won’t have to make too many decisions while you are withdrawing. At first, making decisions may be hard without a cigarette.

35. If you are not going to quit right away, then start cutting down. If you smoke 2 packs a day and you cut back 1 cigarette a day for a month, you will be down to just 10 cigarettes a day. Some people, however, have found cutting back to be almost as hard as quitting.

36. Drink lots of liquids to help flush the poison out of your system. Orange juice is good because smoking depletes the vitamin C content in our bodies.

37. Remember, it is the first cigarette that gets you started. It takes only one. This is the one you don’t have. You can always put off lighting that first one for a little while. Don’t fool yourself and think you can start and stop at will. You can’t. Many people have tried this and gone on to live the rest of their lives never to experience freedom from nicotine again.

38. Frequently remind yourself about the differences you have noticed in yourself. Things like: Your breath no longer smells like a dirty ashtray. Your teeth are beginning to lose their yellow color and look bright and clean. Your fingers aren’t stained from tobacco. That sickly sounding smoker’s cough is disappearing. Your senses of smell and taste are returning. Your complexion is beginning to Improve. Your general attitude about yourself is better because you are beginning to really care about yourself.

39. Give it away. Whenever you have a chance to give your experience, strength and hope to another smoker, use it. This act of giving will insure your chances for staying off nicotine and give strength to your program. There is much reward in helping someone else to gain freedom from this harmful substance.

40. Have a follow-up program. Don’t assume it is over because you have made it through a couple of weeks. Nicotine is very cunning. Continue to attend Nicotine Anonymous meetings. If there are no meetings in your area, help to get one started. It is very simple. All you need are a place to meet and a few interested people.

41. When you want to smoke, read this list of tips.

Article courtesy of www.quitsmokingsupport.com

Look Younger Now!  

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By: Christopher Guerriero
Best Selling Author of “Maximize Metabolism”

Each of us yearns to maintain our youthful appearance, energy and good health free from disease and sickness. We look for help from the “discoveries of science” and “breakthrough drugs” or “elixir’s” full of promise. While we have made significant progress in our understanding of the human body and of life, still we find that the vital health and youthfulness we’re looking for is somewhat elusive. What we scientists ultimately come to recognize is that the “Fountain of Youth” lies “naturally” within each of us.

As we take a look at nature and the lifestyles of earlier cultures, we do not find the problems of disease, sickness or excess weight that occur in our modern society. This should prompt us to see what these cultures are doing that has proven to work throughout time. For example, I try to live a more natural lifestyle in regards to diet (loads of raw vegetables), activity and exercise, environment, and pure distilled water. I incorporate each of these as much as possible, though not perfectly. Nevertheless, the result is a better quality of life largely free from sickness and disease.

Our SAD (Standard American Diet) of today unfortunately consists of highly processed “foods” that starve the body of nutrition and create difficulties for the digestive system, which results in colon problems. It’s known in the natural health industry that over 90% of all human diseases and sickness are from a congested (constipated) colon. This also accelerates the aging process. Modern science hasn’t and won’t find a break-through drug that will restore your health. But they don’t need to. The solution simply is a more natural lifestyle involving the integration of corrective and preventative measures over time. Let me mention a few here.

One corrective measure is to cleanse and detoxify the body to get rid of some of the causes of disease and sickness. This can be done by:

Drinking adequate amounts of pure distilled water.

Stimulate the digestive track by reflexology massage on the sole of the feet every other day. Reflexology charts are available in health stores or online.

Stimulation of the elimination process. There are several great ways to do this, but the easiest is to simply eat a large green salad (full of fresh, raw, preferably organic vegetables) with each of your meals throughout the day. Consuming 3 – 5 salads per day not only helps you look younger, but it also adds years to your life, gives you energy, and helps you lose excess body weight – fast.

If your day is too busy to eat enough raw vegetables each and every day – then simply find yourself a high quality vegetable drink.

Some youth enhancing measures can involve the following:

Start today to migrate your diet from processed and refined devitalized “foods” to whole, raw, organic foods that are full of nutrition and are easily digested.

Increase physical activity and enjoy nature with regular outdoor activities, or by integrating an exercise program, etc.

Take time outdoors each day to breath deeply clean, fresh air.

Be happy, smile often, and laugh daily. Sounds too easy, but eliminating stress is proven to increase health.

Nature has everything to offer if you are willing to indulge. Start today to make these suggestions a part of your new lifestyle. Enjoy good health and long life and find the true fountain of youth within yourself!

Reference :

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What’s in a Cigarette?  

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By: K. H. Ginzel, M.D.

For those who still don't know — let me emphatically state that cigarette smoking is a true addiction! To grasp this well-documented fact, one really doesn't have to study all the supporting scientific evidence. One simply needs to consider that no other drug is self-administered with the persistence, regularity and frequency of a cigarette. At an average rate of ten puffs per cigarette, a one to three pack-a-day smoker inhales 70,000 to 200,000 individual doses of mainstream smoke during a single year. Ever since its large scale industrial production early in this century, the popularity of the modern cigarette has been spreading like wildfire. Here is the first, and perhaps the most significant answer to the title question: Addiction is in a cigarette.

Probing into what makes a cigarette so irresistible, we find that much of the recent research corroborates earlier claims: It is for the nicotine in tobacco that the smoker smokes, the chewer chews, and the dipper dips. Hence, nicotine is in a cigarette.

In contrast to other drugs, nicotine delivery from tobacco carries an ominous burden of chemical poisons and cancer-producing substances that boggle the mind. Many toxic agents are in a cigarette. However, additional toxicants are manufactured during the smoking process by the chemical reactions occurring in the glowing tip of the cigarette. The number is staggering: more than 4,000 hazardous compounds are present in the smoke that smokers draw into their lungs and which escapes into the environment between puffs.

The burning of tobacco generates more than 150 billion tar particles per cubic inch, constituting the visible portion of cigarette smoke. According to chemists at R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, cigarette smoke is 10,000 times more concentrated than the automobile pollution at rush hour on a freeway. The lungs of smokers, puffing a daily ration of 20 to 60 low to high tar cigarettes, collect an annual deposit of one-quarter to one and one-half pounds of the gooey black material, amounting to a total of 15 to 90 million pounds of carcinogen-packed tar for the aggregate of current American smokers. Hence, tar is in a cigarette.

But visible smoke contributes only 5-8% to the total output of a cigarette. The remaining bulk that cannot be seen makes up the so-called vapor or gas phase of cigarette "smoke." It contains, besides nitrogen and oxygen, a bewildering assortment of toxic gases, such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, acrolein, hydrogen cyanide, and nitrogen oxides, to name just a few. Smokers efficiently extract almost 90% of the particulate as well as gaseous constituents (about 50% in the case of carbon monoxide) from the mainstream smoke of the 600 billion cigarettes consumed annually in the U.S. In addition, 2.25 million metric tons of sidestream smoke chemicals pollute the enclosed air spaces of homes, offices, conference rooms, bars, restaurants, and automobiles in this country. Hence, pollution is in a cigarette.

The witch's brew of poisons invades the organs and tissues of smokers and nonsmokers, adults and children, born as well as unborn, and causes cancer, emphysema, heart disease, fetal growth retardation and other problems during pregnancy. The harm inflicted by all other addictions combined pales in comparison. Smoking-related illness, for example, claims in a few days as many victims as cocaine does in a whole year. Hence, disease is in a cigarette.

The irony is that many of the poisons found in cigarette smoke are subject to strict regulation by federal laws which, on the other hand, specifically exempt tobacco products. "Acceptable Daily Intake," ADI, is the amount of a chemical an individual can be exposed to for an extended period without apparent detriment to health. A comparison of the actual intake of selected chemicals in mainstream smoke with their ADIs (see table below) reveals the enormity of toxic exposure incurred by the smoker (note the presence of methyl isocyanide, the toxicant of the Bhopal disaster).

In addition, there is the chemical burden from sidestream smoke, afflicting smokers and non-smokers alike. Based on the reported concentrations in enclosed, cigarette smoke-polluted areas, the estimated intakes of nicotine, acrolein, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde peak at 200, 130, 75, 7, and 3 times the ADI, respectively. The high exposure to acrolein is especially unsettling. This compound is not only a potent respiratory irritant, but qualifies, according to current studies, as a carcinogen.

Regulatory policy aims at restricting exposure to carcinogens to a level where the lifetime risk of cancer would not exceed 1 in 100,000 to 1,000,000. Due to a limited database, approximate upper lifetime risk values could be calculated for only 7 representative cigarette smoke carcinogens. The risk values were extraordinarily high, ranging from 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 16. Because of the awesome amount of carcinogens found in cigarette smoke and the fact that carcinogens combine their individual actions in an additive or even multiplicative fashion, it is not surprising that the actual risk for lung cancer is as high as one in ten. Hence, cancer is in a cigarette.

Among the worst offenders are the nitrosamines. Strictly regulated by federal agencies, their concentrations in beer, bacon, and baby bottle nipples must not exceed 5 to 10 parts per billion. A typical person ingests about one microgram a day, while the smokers' intake tops this by 17 times for each pack of cigarette smoked. In 1976, a rocket fuel manufacturer in the Baltimore area was emitting dimethylnitrosamine into the surrounding air, exposing the local inhabitants to an estimated 14 micrograms of the carcinogen per day. The plant was promptly shut down. However eagerly the government tries to protect us from outdoor pollution and the carcinogenic risk of consumer products, it blatantly suspends control if the offending chemical is in, or comes from, a cigarette. Hence, hypocrisy is in a cigarette.

But there is still more in a cigarette than addiction, poison, pollution, disease, and hypocrisy. A half century of aggressive promotion and sophisticated advertising that featured alluring role models from theater, film and sport, has invested the cigarette with an enticing imagery. Imagery which captivates and seduces a growing youngster. The youngster, indispensable for being recruited into the future army of smokers, does not start to smoke cigarettes for the nicotine, but for the false promises they hold. Hence, deceit is in a cigarette.

In summary, no drug ever ingested by humans can rival the long-term debilitating effects of tobacco; the carnage perpetuated by its purveyors; the merciless irreversibility of destiny once the victim contracts lung cancer or emphysema; the militant denial on the part of those who, with the support of stockholders and the sanction of governments, legally push their lethal merchandise across borders and continents killing every year two and one-half to three million people worldwide. All things added together: death is in a cigarette.

Ingredients added to cigarette products can result in exposure by inhalation, as opposed to their use in foods and beverages, where exposure is by ingestion. For some ingredients used in cigarettes, exposure may be to the pyrolysis products of these ingredients as opposed to exposure to the ingredient in its non-combusted state. Therefore, the regulatory status of ingredients as food components may not be completely applicable to their use in cigarettes. Such information should not be relied upon as a sole basis for a determination that use of an ingredient will not increase the health risks associated with cigarette smoking.

Table: Smokers' Daily Intake of Selected Mainstream Smoke Poisons

Chemical Substance Range* in Multiples of
the Acceptable Daily Intake

Nicotine 400-3,600
Acrolein 50-370
Carbon monoxide 50-250
Methyl isocyanide 6-60
Formaldehyde** 9-40
Hydrogen cyanide 8-30
Acrylamide** 7-20
Cadmium** 3-9
Ammonia 1-5

* Encompassing both the range of cigarette consumption (1 to 3 packs/day) and the weight range of mainstream smoke constituents.
** Established carcinogen (International Agency for Research on Cancer)


Editor's Note:

K. H. Ginzel, M.D., is Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Arkansas. His work is concentrated in the area of nicotine and its effects.